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clintisiceman:

Lisa: Miss Hoover didn’t believe me! She called me a ‘PC thug’!
Homer: I’ve been called a greasy thug, too. It never stops hurting! So here’s what we’re gonna do: we’re gonna grease ourselves up real good and trash that place with a baseball bat!

clintisiceman:

Lisa: Miss Hoover didn’t believe me! She called me a ‘PC thug’!

Homer: I’ve been called a greasy thug, too. It never stops hurting! So here’s what we’re gonna do: we’re gonna grease ourselves up real good and trash that place with a baseball bat!

(via mmmsimpsons)

Photoset

austinkleon:

The birchbark doodles of a 15th century boy

One of the most fascinating archeological finds in Russia has been the discovery of hundreds of “birchbark documents” (messages written on the bark of birch trees with a sharp stylus) that were created from the 11th to the 15th century…

The drawings from Novgorod that we have found appear to all come from a Russian boy named Onfim, who lived at the end of the twelfth century or beginning of the thirteenth century in the city of Novgorod. By the estimate of the archaeologists who unearthed his works, he was around seven years old at the time that he made these drawings.

These are so great and even better with the captions. (“I am a wild beast!”)

(via @pomeranian99 > erikkwakkel)

"…art never improves, but that the material of art is never quite the same." TS Eliot

(via booksinthekitchen)

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"This ain’t nothing to relate to…" Three stars (out of five).

"This ain’t nothing to relate to…" Three stars (out of five).

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Vladimir Nabokov’s mad map of Stephen and Poldy’s journey through Dublin in Ulysses.

Vladimir Nabokov’s mad map of Stephen and Poldy’s journey through Dublin in Ulysses.

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"I don’t know if I need seclusion, but I do like to be alone in a room."

Norman Mailer (via theparisreview)

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explore-blog:

Anything I’ve encountered in the world is never as interesting as a novel… What you find out there is never as exciting as your own creation.

Lovely New Yorker micro-documentary offers a glimpse of the life and work of beloved writer Joyce Carol Oates. Complement with the daily routines and daily rituals of famous authors. 

( Open Culture)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

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theparisreview:

INTERVIEWER

What do you mean by “too literary”? What do you cut out, certain kinds of words?

GEORGES SIMENON

Adjectives, adverbs, and every word which is there just to make an effect. Every sentence which is there just for the sentence. You know, you have a beautiful sentence—cut it. Every time I find such a thing in one of my novels it is to be cut.

From the Art of Fiction No. 9.

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"If I had not existed, someone else would have written me, Hemingway, Dostoyevsky, all of us. Proof of that is that there are about three candidates for the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays. But what is important is Hamlet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, not who wrote them, but that somebody did. The artist is of no importance. Only what he creates is important, since there is nothing new to be said. Shakespeare, Balzac, Homer have all written about the same things, and if they had lived one thousand or two thousand years longer, the publishers wouldn’t have needed anyone since."

William Faulkner (via theparisreview)

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"He would go to the study in the morning after a hearty breakfast and stay there until dinner at about 5:00. Since he skipped lunch, and since his family would not venture near the study — they would blow a horn if they needed him — he could usually work uninterruptedly for several hours. … After dinner, Twain would read his day’s work to the assembled family. He liked to have an audience, and his evening performances almost always won their approval. On Sundays, Twain skipped work to relax with his wife and children, read, and daydream in some shady spot on the farm. Whether or not he was working, he smoked cigars constantly."

Mark Twain ’s routine – and other daily rituals of literary greats. (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via explore-blog)

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theparisreview:

“Reading through the slush pile is like looking for tigers in the jungle: they’re camouflaged not only by their stripes but their surroundings. An editor has to be unflaggingly alert and discerning, alive to any perceptible movement in the shadows.”
Read more from Jeffrey Eugenides on Plimpton Prize winner Ottessa Moshfegh from this year’s Spring Revel here.
Photo Credit Alexander Porter/BFAnyc.com.

theparisreview:

“Reading through the slush pile is like looking for tigers in the jungle: they’re camouflaged not only by their stripes but their surroundings. An editor has to be unflaggingly alert and discerning, alive to any perceptible movement in the shadows.”

Read more from Jeffrey Eugenides on Plimpton Prize winner Ottessa Moshfegh from this year’s Spring Revel here.

Photo Credit Alexander Porter/BFAnyc.com.